The new Daiwa Theory spinning reel - too good to be true ?

How times have changed for me. For years I bought and fished with multipliers like it was going out of fashion, indeed you should see the collection of various SLOSH 20s and 30s I have here - I even have a pair of the older, original SLOSH 20 and 30 reels where you could replace the frame screws with countersunk stainless steel ones and they are as tough as old boots. Spinning reels for me back then were used principally for my mullet fishing and were viewed as not much more than an add-on to my "real" reels - much like spinning rods compared to beachcasters. Now though and I look at fishing reels the other way round - whilst I will always have the multipliers here, it's the spinning reels that really get me going these days, and yes, I do like messing around with different ones to see what's out there for the money.

For a while now it seems to have been the outstanding Shimano Rarenium that has been the must-have spinning reel at around the "just over the £150" mark and I see loads of them out and about - I also hear of very little going wrong with them, indeed with what we put then through near and sometimes in saltwater I think some modern reels are marvels of modern technology. The Rareniums are class bits of kit, but how about this new Daiwa Theory spinning reel that I must presume has been priced to compete with the Rarenium ? I have been using and thoroughly abusing one now for a while and I am that impressed with it that I have to ask the question - is this new Daiwa Theory simply too good to be true ? Compared to what I used to spend on spinning reels the princely sum of £170 for a reel like this is a fortune, but with what I know these days I reckon this not insignificant amount of money represents outstanding value for money. By no means is every single lure angler able to or even prepared to spend north of £150 on a spinning reel, but the simple fact is that these days if you look around and buy wisely you can get some incredible products for the dosh, and with my own experiences of this new Theory I reckon it's pure class...........

I don't know this for a fact, but I presume the Daiwa Theory that we are seeing here in the UK is a renamed Daiwa Freams - I might well be wrong, but they sure look pretty similar to me, and instead of me trying to waffle on about technical specs that don't remotely interest me, take a look here for a load of info on the Daiwa Freams/Theory. I have to guess that this new Oil Seal is a cheaper version of the Mag Seal found in the Caldia (sublime) and the Certate (desire !!), but with what I have been putting the Theory through it seems to work just fine. In the UK we can get this new Theory in 2500, 3000 and 4000 sizes - I have been fishing with the little 2500 size, but my friend Ger Carey over in Ireland has been fishing with the 3000 size since it came out in the UK and he's loving it. I will keep you posted because if there is one lure angler out there who will find a weakness in a reel it's Ger. He fishes a lot. I mean a serious amount, plus he catches a mere bass or two along the way !!

It's almost pointless telling you how smooth this new Daiwa Theory is to fish with, because you know as well as I do that spinning reels around this price from the likes of Daiwa and Shimano are sublime to use. I fish with a very tight drag and I don't like giving bass much if any line if I can help it, but yes, line comes off just as easily as you like if needs be. Some reels feel right in my hands and some don't, and from the off this Theory just felt about as perfect a reel as I have picked up. Close your eyes and I swear it could almost be a Certate. Seriously. The line lay is very good and I love the fact that a spare spool comes in the box. I always, always take a spare spool loaded up with braid when I go out fishing. I don't tend to suffer from wind knots but you just never know when it might all go a bit wrong, and having a spare spool ready to go could be vital. It can also be useful to carry a couple of different kinds of line or breaking strains. And yes, it drives me mad that the really high-end spinning reels don't come with spare spools as standard.

I can usually find something about an item of fishing gear that I don't like/get or would like to change, but try as I might I can't find one single thing about this new Daiwa Theory that niggles me. As much as I love the handle shape on the Luvias 3000 for example, I am really liking the handle on the Theory. I can't tell you whether the reel is going to last and become a classic like the Shimano Rarenium, but my gut is that this Daiwa Theory is pure class and I guess that if you are looking for a new spinning reel at around the "just over the £150 mark but well below £200" then I guess there's a new kid in town. Too good to be true ? I don't reckon so.............

Yesterday was a pretty big day for me - I took our puppy Storm out for her first fishing trip on the rocks. She's been to the beach enough times and I know she can swim perfectly well (she has been "encouraged" to go in the sea and various rock pools a few times), but the time had come to get her out fishing with me to see how she might do. I had forgotten what having a puppy was like after I got so used to how Jess was as an adult for so many years, but Storm is doing brilliantly and she just loves my girls to bits - and they love having her and being with a puppy as she grows up. I do the bulk of the training but then they all chip in when needs be. Talk about energy, but then as a family we have always been used to going on loads of decent walks, indeed my girls I reckon walk faster and further than most adults. Aside from catching a bunch of smallish wrasse yesterday on the soft plastics, I was over the moon at how good Storm was on the rocks. My new fishing dog. As an aside, what on earth is up with this weather ? I put suncream on yesterday to go out fishing yet this morning it's back to rain and cold. Early summer ? Drought ? Never a dull day when it comes to the weather here in good old Blighty !!