Help and Info

Rigging a shad/paddletail on a jig head

  • Photo Essay

    I am sure that we have all used various kinds of soft plastic “shads” before, whether shore or boat fishing, but this Xorus Rolling Shad seems to be something a bit special for bass fishing. Here a white Xorus Rolling Shad in the 150mm size is being teamed up with a Decoy Pentagon ½ oz 3/0 jig head.

  • Photo Essay

    In order to make sure you mount the shad correctly, it helps to measure the length of the actual jig head against the body of the soft plastic. I tend to actually mark where the hook needs to come out with a pen to help give me a visual guide when I am threading it on.

  • Photo Essay

    Begin threading the Rolling Shad onto the hook of the jig head much like you would a lugworm or something like that. Stick the point of the hook into the middle of the flat end of the shad and then begin to thread it through.

  • Photo Essay

    Bear in mind that the hook needs to end up coming out of the soft plastic body of the shad on the flat side, so that the lure flutters down when you sink and draw it. They are designed to be rigged like this, and I know it works well. Ease that hook through the shad and bring the point out where you have made a mark, or otherwise just do it visually. Believe me, it is hugely simple.

  • Photo Essay

    The Xorus Rolling Shad mounted on a Decoy Pentagram ½ oz 3/0 jig head. A soft plastic lure that is fast gaining a very good reputation for catching some big bass. There are various ways you can fish a soft plastic shad, but a very most consistent method when shore fishing tends to be to cast out and across the current and then retrieve it slowly with a “sink and draw” kind of action. Let the shad hit the bottom, pick up the slack, and then lift the rod tip up followed by letting it almost fall back down again – “sink and draw”. This enables the Rolling Shad to flutter head up as you lift the rod tip up, and then flutter back down (head first) to the bottom as you let it drop. This makes that tail vibrate enticingly. Reel a few turns and do it again and again. You would be surprised at how much ground you can cover with this lure, especially in a strong current when you can “sink and draw retrieve” very slowly because the lure is always working in the tide. Shads work best when tide makes their tails vibrate.