It’s quite something how a good modern lure rod recovers so quickly, and this is a 4-16g rod casting a 14g lure as well

My understanding about the “recovery” of a fishing rod is how quickly it snaps back to straight during the cast - or “recovers” - and a faster recovery in turn I believe can lead to longer and perhaps more precise casts because the rod tip is spending less time bouncing up and down and trying to come back to straight as the lure flies out. Please correct me if I am wrong by the way, but that is my basic understanding of the subject…………

So I thought I’d show you a cast that my friend Mark did over the weekend, using this stunning Favorite SkyLine 862ML lure rod - it’s 8’6’’ long and rated to cast lures of 4-16g - yep, I’m messing around with a somewhat lighter lure rod than I would usually use, and a review will be up in due course. As it stands at the moment, this is the first rod from the Favorite brand that I have used, and whilst I know little about rod design, this thing seems like it was born to fish soft plastics such as the OSP DoLive Stick. It’s a lightweight weapon, it’s very fast, and it’s a frigging delight to fish with.

Anyway, as a photographer working with cameras that can shoot multiple frames per second, I get to really see how these good modern lure rods recover, and it’s noticeable how quickly some of these rods literally snap back to straight so quickly - and what I need to do one day is grab an older style spinning rod that came from say the salmon lure world, photograph that during a good cast, and then show you how different the recovery is. The Favorite rod here bounces down hard for literally a split second and then comes back to straight very, very quickly, whereas a slower rod is going to do more “bouncing” before getting back to straight.  

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There is nothing remotely scientific here, indeed that’s not the point, but I thought it might be of interest to see a light lure rod casting a 14g 6’’ OSP DoLive Stick at 11fps (frames per second). Bear in mind here that Mark is a good caster and he’s using the wind coming from behind him to launch the lure a little higher than usual, hence that slightly higher release angle - which might accentuate the fast recovery a little. I asked him to stand where he was and cast because it gave me a good angle to photograph a simple casting sequence like this. I am not trying to prove anything here and I am obviously not an expert, but I like shooting these casting sequences and I will try to include some with future rod reviews. This is the full sequence, starting from when Mark is about to turn the power on, no frames have been removed, and it's shown up until the rod recovers back to straight.